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In the news today, July 19

Last Updated Jul 19, 2018 at 7:40 am EST

Ontario Premier Doug Ford, left to right, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister and Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball chat as they wait for the official photo at the meeting of Canadian premiers in St. Andrews, N.B., on Wednesday, July 18, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Six stories in the news for Thursday, July 19

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PREMIERS SET TO OPEN TWO DAYS OF MEETINGS

The federal carbon pricing policy is expected to be a key topic as the premiers open two days of talks today in St. Andrews, N.B. Ontario is scrapping its cap-and-trade program and Saskatchewan has mounted a legal challenge against the carbon price. Inter-provincial trade, the U.S. trade dispute, health care and the Alberta-B.C. skirmish over the Trans Mountain pipeline project are other key items on the agenda.

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LIBERALS TO TOUT CHILD BENEFIT BOOST

Thousands of Indigenous families living on-reserve will miss out on a boost to the federal child benefit that MPs plan to tout at dozens of events today. Almost every Canadian family receives the monthly benefit, but take-up rates for families on-reserve has consistently lagged behind the wider population — largely chalked up to lower tax filing rates among Indigenous families.

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TRUDEAU SHUFFLES CABINET AHEAD OF 2019 ELECTION

Justin Trudeau has unveiled his pre-election cabinet in a shuffle designed to showcase new faces and address increasingly troublesome files — from border security, to trade promotion, to the potential for scraps with the provinces. In Wednesday’s shuffle, the prime minister gave new portfolios to six ministers and expanded his cabinet by promoting five other MPs to his front benches as the Liberals get in position for next year’s federal election.

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ANTI-PIPELINE PROTESTERS BEING EVICTED

Burnaby, B.C. is evicting protesters from a make-shift camp set up outside one of Kinder Morgan’s terminals, citing fire safety and health concerns. City manager Lambert Chu says the city is worried about how the footprint of the site, dubbed Camp Cloud, has grown to include a two-level wood structure, additional tents and even shower facilities. The Metro Vancouver city issued a 72-hour eviction notice on Wednesday.

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VERDICT EXPECTED IN MONTREAL BOY’S DEATH

A verdict is expected today in the case of a Montreal-area police officer charged with dangerous driving causing the death of a five-year-old boy in 2014. Nicholas Thorne-Belance was in his father’s car when it was struck by an unmarked police cruiser allegedly driven by Patrick Ouellet in Longueuil, south of Montreal. His trial last month heard the car was travelling at more than 120 km/h in a 50 km/h zone.

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CANADA COULD BE CAUGHT UP IN U.S. URANIUM PROBE

Canada could get caught in the crossfire after the U.S. Department of Commerce launched another national security investigation, this time by looking into uranium imports. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says U.S. production of uranium for military and electric power has decreased to five per cent of its consumption from 49 per cent in 1987. Canada is not the target, although all countries are potentially subject to the investigation.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:

— Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will visit the Tim Horton Memorial Camp in McDougall, Ont.

— Environment Minister Catherine McKenna will announce federal funding to protect and restore freshwater resources.

— A verdict is possible today in the judge-alone first-degree murder trial of Dellen Millard, alleged to have killed his father.

— Court appearance for former Burns Lake, B.C. mayor Luke Strimbold on 24 sex-related charges.

— Statistics Canada will release the employment insurance figures for May.