A heat warning and severe thunderstorm watch for Toronto and the GTA have ended.

Environment Canada issued the heat warning — the first of the summer — on Monday but ended it shortly before 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday. The severe thunderstorm watch was issued at 1:18 p.m. on Tuesday and ended at 7:30 p.m.

“Heat warnings are issued when very high temperature or humidity conditions are expected to pose an elevated risk of heat illnesses, such as heat stroke or heat exhaustion,” the weather agency said in a statement.

The Humidex values are expected to approach 40 C on Tuesday afternoon, it said.

This was the first day above 30 C since June 30, noted CityNews meteorologist Adam Stiles.

The forecast for Toronto and the GTA called for a high of 31 C. The temperature reached 31.3 C at Pearson airport around 3 p.m. Tuesday.

“If we surpass that 31.4 C temperature of June 17, then this will be the warmest day so far this year,” 680News meteorologist Jill Taylor said on Tuesday.

“We likely won’t be setting any records though for Aug. 26. The record for this day is 36.7 C set in 1948.”

The extreme heat is only expected to last one day as cooler air is expected to move into the area on Tuesday night. Temperatures are forecast to hover around the low-to-mid 20s through Labour Day.

In addition to the heat, the region can expect some serious humidity.

“We’ve be starved from the southwest wind this summer and that’s usually what we need to get temperatures to crack that 30-degree mark,” Stiles explained. “This summer has been dominated by a southeast lake breeze – and that keeps our temperatures cool.”

Health officials are warning the public to drink lots of water to decrease your risk of dehydration.

The City of Toronto has yet to issue a heat or extreme-heat alert this year.

Toronto Public Health issues a heat alert when “forecast weather conditions suggest that the likelihood of a high level of mortality is between 25 and 50 per cent greater than what would be expected on a typical day.”

An extreme heat alert is when “weather conditions suggest that the likelihood of a high level of mortality is at least 50 per cent greater than what would be expected on a typical day.”

Environment Canada added that health risks from the high heat are greatest for older adults, infants, people with chronic illnesses, homeless people and those who work and exercise in the heat.