Karen Stintz has dropped out of the mayoral race citing a lack of financial support and saying she has no immediate plans to return to politics.

“I’m disappointed my vision and ideas did not gain the traction I had hoped,” Stintz said when announcing her decision.

In her announcement, she did not endorse any other mayoral candidates and said she will not run for her old city council seat in Ward 16, Eglinton-Lawrence.

She said she is starting a new chapter, but did not expand on her future plans other than to “get through the next council meeting” and prepare her kids to go back to school next month.

Stintz’s departure marks a significant milestone in the heated Toronto mayoral race. Stintz — who only held about 4 per cent of popular vote according to recent polls — has been a major voice for transit reform, having recently acted as TTC chair.

Stintz is seen as a centre-right candidate, similar to front-runner John Tory, so those votes may now shift to him.

680News political analyst John Stall says the frustrations of the job seemed to overtake Stintz.

“City Hall is an unworkable animal most of the time. People who really do want to get things done and think they have the answer have a very hard time keeping the patience. I think what I saw in this news conference was a lack of patience to continue,” said Stall.

Fellow candidate Tory thanked Stintz for her service in a statement released soon after the announcement.

“As an advocate, city councillor and as TTC chair, she championed Toronto neighbourhoods and families, and we all owe her a debt of gratitude for her public service,” Tory said.

Rob Ford also offered his thanks to Stintz in a written statement.

“Although we did not always see eye-to-eye on my plans to build the Sheppard Subway, Councillor Stintz has been a valuable ally who supported me in delivering on my fiscally responsible agenda and saving the City of Toronto hundreds of millions of dollars,” Ford said.

 

There are still 70 candidates, including Stintz, listed as mayoral candidates on the City of Toronto’s election website.

Click here to see exclusive video interviews with the three dozen who accepted CityNews’ invitation.