News that a property management company had been removing bicycles parked on city property near Yonge and Bloor streets sparked a dialogue about public-private space and the availability of bicycle parking.

Here are some things you might not know about locking up two wheels in the city.

1. Eighty-eight per cent of Toronto cyclists and 80 per cent of non-cyclists believe there’s a shortage of secure bike parking in the city, according to a study conducted by the city last year.

2. In the same report, seven in 10 cyclists said they park their bikes at informal spots like gas pipes, trees and fences. Reasons cited include lack of proper parking and how close the spot was to their destination.

A bike is seen locked to a fence in Toronto on Taken on June 24, 2010. FLICKR/Naila Jinnah

A bike is seen locked to a fence in Toronto on June 24, 2010. FLICKR/Naila Jinnah

3. Rusty and damaged bikes left on the city’s post-and-ring stands may be tagged and removed. Once a notice has been attached to a bicycle, the owner has seven days to claim it before the solid waste department takes action. Bikes that are damaged beyond use may be removed without notice. There’s no guarantee owners will have their bikes returned.

A damaged bike is seen attached to a city bike stand on Jan. 7, 2007. FLICKR/Emily Tu

A damaged bike is seen attached to a city bike stand on Jan. 7, 2007. FLICKR/Emily Tu

4. The city designed new stands in 2012 after news stories revealed the metal rings on the original 1980s-era model could be broken off with a two-by-four, a report in the Toronto Star said.

5. Toronto’s Bicycle Locking Ring Program allows for parking of more than 17,000 bikes. Anyone can suggest a location for a new stand — it must be a city sidewalk or boulevard — by emailing streetfurniture@toronto.ca.

A post-and ring bike stand is shown on April 12, 2012. FLICKR/ the_riel_thing

A post-and ring bike stand is shown in Toronto on April 12, 2012. FLICKR/ the_riel_thing