The Toronto Police Services Board unanimously voted Thursday night to approve a carding policy.

Carding allows police to stop citizens and document personal details without arresting or charging them. The Black Action Defence Committee filed a class action complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario in February, alleging racial profiling.

Under the newly approved policy, officers must now tell the people they’ve stopped that they’re not under arrest and are free to leave without answering questions.

Police must also hand out a receipt to the person stopped that explains why they were stopped and the name of the officer who did the check.

The guidelines for stopping a person are now much stricter and officers must have a reason, like a specific offense, for detainment.

The police chief will also have to establish new training, supervision and reporting guidelines.

The recommendations, 31 in total, will be phased in over the next three years.

Earlier this month, Toronto residents were invited to have their say on the proposed policy.

Thursday’s meeting at police headquarters began at 6 p.m. and was open to the public.

Click here to read the agenda item.